Tom Evans’ Soulwave – short, thought provoking read

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A Short Novel With a Fast Pace and A Wake-up Call For Us All

Christine Miller

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Soulwave is a short story about a possible fascinating future, which is designed to whet the appetite for Tom’s expanded and expanding visionary work in progress, and it certainly does just that.

The self-contained story is well-researched, fantastical and compelling, woven through with hints of possible plot twists, and gives just enough hints about the characters to encourage anticipation of what is yet to come.

And it just could be a future that is waiting to happen, hidden in plain view. Mind-opening and thought provoking.
Currently FREE on Kindle and I Tunes.
Highly Recommended.

Author’s Description

At only 7000 words long, you can read the whole book in a single commute on your iPhone or Kindle.

Soulwave tells of a fictional account of a possible near-future for the Earth and humanity. It is a sober reminder of how life on this planet is special and to be treasured.

It tells of a world where the ice caps have melted, the population has renormalised and of the cosmic joke to end all cosmic jokes – as far as humanity is concerned.

It’s written to inspire people to look up in wonder and amazement and to treat every day as if it is your last. We are only here and alive by the slimmest of chances and margins. This we must be eternally grateful for.

Soulwave is a future-history – that is something that might just happen It has happened to the Earth in the past and will undoubtedly happen again – we just can’t say when. It makes any fears about global warming seem trivial.

Although the message seems terminal, the story is really about how life propagates around the Universe that we are just one small part of. It will make you realise that we are only alive on this planet at this time by the slimmest of coincidences. Our planet and solar system are very special and we should cherish them and look after them.

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Author: Tom Evans
Website: Tom Evans
Kindle: Soulwave
ITunes: Soulwave

 

 

Love Is – More than rosy moments

Come To Love Christine Miller

heartstone Christine MillerLove Is

I was reflecting this morning that this is the first Valentine’s Day for three years that I haven’t been involved in some kind of poetry competition or promotion – 2010 and 2011, I was working with Hallmark Cards as a judge on a ‘Twittermantic’ project offering a prize for the best short romantic verse, with the winning words being turned into a card. Great fun and we attracted lots of entries both times.

Last year, I was working with QVC, the shopping channel, as resident poet on a Love Letters campaign to help the British public write messages of love to their loved ones – I turned out hundreds of poems in two days, and it was great fun. Each entrant received a beautiful, specially designed card with a personalised verse inside, and the requests came from sons and daughters, parents and friends as well as romantic interests, the long-married and newly established and those hopeful for relationships to develop. There were some deeply moving stories of loss, illness, misfortune – through which Love had triumphed and endured, and it was such a delightfully endearing project.

Although not publicly involved this year, I am,  as well as writing a book about Love in Organisations, deeply engaged in the process of bringing together a new volume of poems called ‘Courage to Love’, and this seems like the ideal time to give you a sneak preview.

This one is called ‘Come to Love’ and seems quite fitting for Valentine’s Day, even if it’s a little alternative. It’s really a statement that hearts and flowers and romance are not the essence of lasting love. We need more of the kind of love that endures and grows, standing up to all kinds of challenges and upsets, just like every aspect of human life. A Love that is present not only between couples and in families, but throughout our lives, including our work, our politics, and the way we engage with nature and the environment – in fact, throughout the planet, even the cosmos.

I like to think of us rising and standing in love, strong and courageous and loyal, collectively, rather than falling in love and being infatuated, on a hormonal high which inevitably recedes and leaves us wondering what we saw in that person in the first place. A Love that simply Is…not always easy, but one we know will endure the ups, downs and broadsides of human life.

I dedicate this poem to Love  - as a way of being and becoming; inclusive, extensive and pervasive, bringing the joy and spirit of human flourishing to us all.

Christine Miller

Happy Valentine’s Day – Loving Every Day, Every Loving Day 

Come To Love Christine Miller

The Secrets of Mastering Time

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Mastery in Time – Christine Miller

time fliesIn our modern world, ‘time’ seems to be at a premium; the majority claim they don’t have enough, and overload is a common complaint. Bombarded with information from multiple sources, many feel that time runs away with and from them, and they can never catch up.

So when I was recently invited by my friend Tom Evans, aka the Bookwright, to attend one of his time-bending workshops, and experiment with expanding, extending and transcending time, my curiosity was piqued.

‘I don’t have time’ could have been my response, ‘I’m far too busy’.

But I know that I can make time for the things I choose to do.

And I also have a policy of not describing myself as busy, because again, I will always find time for the people and activities I love. It might require some dancing around schedules, but it’s possible.

It’s a paradox that time can apparently pass at different rates for two people in the same space performing the same activity.  That brings back memories of schooldays! The one who is fully engaged and enjoying what they are involved in finds time whizzing by rapidly; but if you’re bored and uninterested, time drags slowly by and feels interminable. Same minutes and hours, different outlook, different outcome!

I pondered how we usually only procrastinate about what we are reluctant to do….then thought,
is that true? Do we?

What about those juicy, fulfilling projects that could transform many lives including our own? Do we always press on with those, and finish them off promptly, or does their importance and consequence bring up fears and reluctance because they might just lead to great change and transformation?

Sometimes change, welcome or unwelcome, makes us uncomfortable, so we shelve activities and make excuses in order to stay the same. It’s a bit crazy, really, because we and our world are changing constantly, ceaselessly, evolving with every breath, every action, every thought and feeling, so we might as well just get on with it. Yet still, sometimes, we resist.

We all have a different way of relating to time, and this varies at different times of our lives, the year, the day and the circumstance – obvious, I know, but sometimes we forget what is under our noses or ticking away on our wrists!

I found this poem which captures thoughts about time, expressed beautifully and engraved on a Sundial in a garden:

Time

Is

Too slow for those who wait

Too swift for those who fear

Too long for those who grieve

Too short for those who rejoice

But for those who Love

Time

Is

Eternity

by Henry Van Dyke

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More about the poem Yaddo Gardens

Tom’s Time Bending workshop offered us the opportunity to alter our perception of time, to play with the past, present and future, and to understand how we can create shifts in time and space to ensure things happen ‘just in time’. The old saying ‘time flies when you’re enjoying yourself’ certainly applied, as the day flew by, in very pleasant surroundings with a fascinating group of people also exploring a type of time travel – without an obvious tardis, more of a ‘build your own’ time machine approach! And it was time well spent, for sure.

If you want to bend time, and find more time for yourself, Tom has some workshops coming up in the near future – details here.

You might also be interested in reading this article on Transformation 

by Christine Miller

Work as Play

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Work as Play - The Heart and Spirit of Business

work as play christine miller It seems that increasing numbers of us are looking for different ways to live in a more balanced and fulfilling way, so that we feel connected with our work.

At the heart of this is the growing desire to have a sense of purpose and a yearning for meaning in how we spend our time and make our living. We want to feel the spirit of what we do – to be inspired.


People who have been working in organisations for many years are now being asked to re-apply for their jobs, unable to take them for granted any more and having to market themselves as the best candidates. This means they are in effect becoming more entrepreneurial in their approach to their positions. And those entering or rejoining the job market need to be very clear and precise about what they offer and how they fit with prospective employers, both for their own sake in finding satisfying work, and in order to attract a suitable opportunity. (See:
The ReSourceful Candidate)

Entrepreneurs, the self-employed, creatives and small business owners already know the importance of  this, but sometimes, running a business or being a freelance feels more like a job that ties you down than an uplifting experience of creativity, wealth and fulfillment. And the dream you started out with becomes a drudgery that leaves you working longer and longer hours just to stand still.
 
I had my most recent experience as an employee in the corporate world over 11 years ago now, and friends and colleagues who’ve known me for years (and even some who haven’t known me for long!) comment on the way I’ve crafted what is essentially the perfect job for me – meeting people and asking them about their current thinking and passions, guiding, coaching and mentoring executives, leaders and business people into the best options for them so that they LOVE what they do, writing, being creative, being playful – and having lots of fun.
 
Most of the time, I can’t distinguish whether I’m working or playing, so that my work becomes play for me…that’s a great joy. It didn’t happen by accident – I did actually deliberately create and craft the ‘playground’ (otherwise known as workspaces!)  in which I operate, and it is a highly productive space. And it evolves all the time, as I develop and learn and share with clients in workshops and individual sessions.
 
Find out more about loving work at www.loveworks.co 

How to fail your way to success

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How to fail your way to success - why it’s good to get it wrong… sometimes

Failure, Fear, Feedback and Fascination

In business, venture capitalists know that only a small percentage of the projects they invest in will make it financially, hence they have an ‘if you’re going to fail, fail fast’ mentality so they can move on and support the companies that are succeeding and thereby recoup their investment.

The quicker you make mistakes and recover from them, changing what you do and how you do it, the more your chances of succeeding. In sales, collecting the ‘nos’ so you get closer to a ‘yes’ is a way of bolstering the spirits and confidence of the salesperson, helping them to persist and ultimately arrive at the closed sale.

There has been such a huge emphasis on ‘success’ in our world it has made it difficult for people to admit to failure, though it’s often the times we don’t achieve what we set out to that teach us the most, both about ourselves and our projects, and help us to be more resourceful. The idea of the ‘survival of the fittest’ is really more the survival of the most flexible and adaptable, fleet of thought and action. 

I have stories from my work with young people, where, gliding through the system with ease, with no failures or impediments until a sudden roadblock arises, has left a gifted and talented teenager devastated and unsure.  The doors that had always opened effortlessly are now suddenly slamming shut – and they have neither resources nor an alternative view of the future, nor means for coping with that upset and rejection.

They don’t know how to take the experience as a valuable resource in building resilience, and use it as a ‘set-up’ for future achievements, because they have never been taught how to manage themselves in such a way.  It’s not what our current education system does, and sadly it leaves a lot of casualties in its wake who feel branded and boxed as failures when it doesn’t need to be that way.

Failure

Adopting a different perspective, if we take ‘failure’ to mean simply not achieving the result we set out to accomplish this time, and acknowledge that we did achieve something even if it was unexpected or undesirable, it’s much easier to accept that failure is a temporary setback that can be corrected and adjusted. Moving from a position of ‘Trial and Error’ to ‘Try-all and Success’ makes a difference, and we can regroup, rethink and carry on.

Fear

If we can work with the idea that we are not going to improve with every attempt, or trial, (think experimenting and persevering, not tedium and stress!) then the fear of not achieving is removed, and we can feel more relaxed about finding new ways to approach whatever it is we want to accomplish. If we know that plateaus, dips and even troughs can occur alongside peaks and pinnacles, we can assimilate it into the way things really are, and it helps reduce the pressures.

We all know fear is a major inhibiting factor for success, but it is easier said than done to eradicate it in a world that revolves around constantly winning and being ‘right’.

Fear of failure, of being judged as in some way wanting, is something most of us have suffered from at some time and having the courage to push through allows us to go on to success.

Feedback

This is where Feedback comes in. If we can be gracious and accepting in failure, rather than sulking or quitting, we learn valuable lessons from what happens in the process, which we can take with us to the next trial. In NLP (neuro-linguistic programming) one of the presuppositions is that there is ‘no failure, only feedback’: your results tell you what you need to know to be able to move forward.

In a way, it is true, but telling that to someone who has just had exam results that definitely failed to get them into the school they wanted is a tricky business! The language around education demarcates ‘pass’ and ‘fail’ very clearly. The feedback is very clear; you didn’t answer the questions correctly.
Feedback from failure: Learn more; apply it better for next time. Getting to the point of accepting that maybe it was for the best in the long run takes time and sensitivity.

Fascination

So what happens when you don’t get what you want? How can you deal with it more elegantly? Can you become fascinated by your ‘failure’ so that you experience it from a position of researcher, observer, analyst, in the style of the scientific method, which always attempts to disprove its hypotheses and therefore acknowledges the process rather than the outcome? Can you extract the lessons with good grace so that you use them as a lever to propel you to success?

If you can get to the position where you say to yourself ‘How fascinating!’ as you fail, or fall or don’t get what you want, rather than swearing or sulking, you’ll gather more clues of what needs to be done next time to succeed. Fascination is more comfortable than frustration, and more likely to bring you the outcome you want, faster.

What fascinates you about failure? What experiences could you re-vision as a resource for your future success?

We’d love to know. 

 © Christine Miller

(Adapted from ‘Fail your way to success’, first published Sept 2011 at www.birdsontheblog.co.uk

Christine Miller – The Resourceful Entrepreneur’s Guide

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‘Resourceful Entrepreneurs Guide’: some great reviews

“We’re All Entrepreneurs Now”
says
Marshall Goldsmith, Top 15 Leading Thinkers of the World,
Multi-million bestselling author


The world needs resourceful entrepreneurs. Global leaders from Presidents to Prime Ministers like the UK’s David Cameron tell us so. They are depending on vibrant business to revive the economy.


That’s why this practical, comprehensive book has been created especially for entrepreneurs and all those interested in success at work.

With a Foreword by the UK’s business guru René Carayol, it offers insights from a wide range of leaders including Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus, creator of the globally renowned Grameen Bank, and Lord Andrew Mawson, one of the UK’s most successful social entrepreneurs.

There is invaluable information from top sales, marketing, financial and personal development experts, helping you to define your goals, manage the business lifecycle, get confident with selling, and understand your money and Financial IQ.

You’ll discover how to write books to establish your reputation, learn more effective time management, and be guided in entrepreneurial thinking and being authentic.

FIND OUT MORE HERE

“Let this book be part of YOUR journey; a perfect accompaniment for any entrepreneur – and one that sparks ideas and generates momentum.”
René Carayol, MBE, Britain’s Business Guru, Inspired Leaders Network

“It looks really fantastic – great job. I love it – short, sweet and densely packed with no fluff and the essence of what entrepreneurs needs.
Success in business is not necessarily having the right product or service at the right time and knowing how to get people to buy it.

There is something much more fundamental than that and it’s about having the right mind set. This intelligent and formative book starts out by explaining how key priming your mind for success is. 

What then follows is a wealth of information from some incredible business minds. It is also typical of the generosity of the author Christine Miller not to have attempted to paraphrase the wisdom of the contributors but to have designed the meta-concept behind the book and woven together contributions in such a seamless manner.

This book is easy to read and the ideas it contains easy to implement. If you are serious about business and want to discover a fresh approach, it is invaluable reading.”

Tom Evans, Author of Blocks, Flavours of Thought and The Art and Science of Lightbulb Moments

“Christine has an extraordinary way with words. They reach deep inside of you and touch those thoughts you know are there but have been fearful of acknowledging.

Having turned the key she opens the door and gives you the courage and tools to move forward into becoming a truly resourceful entrepreneur fit for the challenging times we are facing at the beginning of this amazing 21st century. Christine shows us how we can put our special gifts and talents out into this world making it a better place for everyone.  

Whatever Christine writes is worth reading – she has a way of getting to the core of her subject making it readable, practical and usable, and her poetry is sublime. She has a rare gift, check out her books and poetry now.”

Lindsay Hart, Consultant, Fundraiser, Strategist

“The Resourceful Entrepreneur’s Guide  - there’s a lot of excellent material in there – well done.”
Chris West, Marketer & Professional Writer

I am currently reading Resourceful Entrepreneur’s Guide to Business in the 21st Century …..very informative and very well written, I am finding it most useful in my ongoing pursuit of success.”
David Ross, David Ross Acting Academy

“It is certainly a book of inspiration, energy and proven skills for the aspiring and seasoned Entrepreneur.
Well done on your initiative.” 

Carole Spiers, International Motivational Speaker, Entrepreneur and Awards Host