Christine Miller – The Resourceful Entrepreneur’s Guide

‘Resourceful Entrepreneurs Guide’: some great reviews

“We’re All Entrepreneurs Now”
says
Marshall Goldsmith, Top 15 Leading Thinkers of the World,
Multi-million bestselling author


The world needs resourceful entrepreneurs. Global leaders from Presidents to Prime Ministers like the UK’s David Cameron tell us so. They are depending on vibrant business to revive the economy.


That’s why this practical, comprehensive book has been created especially for entrepreneurs and all those interested in success at work.

With a Foreword by the UK’s business guru René Carayol, it offers insights from a wide range of leaders including Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus, creator of the globally renowned Grameen Bank, and Lord Andrew Mawson, one of the UK’s most successful social entrepreneurs.

There is invaluable information from top sales, marketing, financial and personal development experts, helping you to define your goals, manage the business lifecycle, get confident with selling, and understand your money and Financial IQ.

You’ll discover how to write books to establish your reputation, learn more effective time management, and be guided in entrepreneurial thinking and being authentic.

FIND OUT MORE HERE

“Let this book be part of YOUR journey; a perfect accompaniment for any entrepreneur – and one that sparks ideas and generates momentum.”
René Carayol, MBE, Britain’s Business Guru, Inspired Leaders Network

“It looks really fantastic – great job. I love it – short, sweet and densely packed with no fluff and the essence of what entrepreneurs needs.
Success in business is not necessarily having the right product or service at the right time and knowing how to get people to buy it.

There is something much more fundamental than that and it’s about having the right mind set. This intelligent and formative book starts out by explaining how key priming your mind for success is. 

What then follows is a wealth of information from some incredible business minds. It is also typical of the generosity of the author Christine Miller not to have attempted to paraphrase the wisdom of the contributors but to have designed the meta-concept behind the book and woven together contributions in such a seamless manner.

This book is easy to read and the ideas it contains easy to implement. If you are serious about business and want to discover a fresh approach, it is invaluable reading.”

Tom Evans, Author of Blocks, Flavours of Thought and The Art and Science of Lightbulb Moments

“Christine has an extraordinary way with words. They reach deep inside of you and touch those thoughts you know are there but have been fearful of acknowledging.

Having turned the key she opens the door and gives you the courage and tools to move forward into becoming a truly resourceful entrepreneur fit for the challenging times we are facing at the beginning of this amazing 21st century. Christine shows us how we can put our special gifts and talents out into this world making it a better place for everyone.  

Whatever Christine writes is worth reading – she has a way of getting to the core of her subject making it readable, practical and usable, and her poetry is sublime. She has a rare gift, check out her books and poetry now.”

Lindsay Hart, Consultant, Fundraiser, Strategist

“The Resourceful Entrepreneur’s Guide  – there’s a lot of excellent material in there – well done.”
Chris West, Marketer & Professional Writer

I am currently reading Resourceful Entrepreneur’s Guide to Business in the 21st Century …..very informative and very well written, I am finding it most useful in my ongoing pursuit of success.”
David Ross, David Ross Acting Academy

“It is certainly a book of inspiration, energy and proven skills for the aspiring and seasoned Entrepreneur.
Well done on your initiative.” 

Carole Spiers, International Motivational Speaker, Entrepreneur and Awards Host

An Audience with HH the Dalai Lama

An Audience with HH the Dalai Lama

dalai2His Holiness The Dalai Lama –
The Embodiment of Compassion

I was fortunate and honoured to be part of the Press group with the Dalai Lama when he visited the UK in 2008, there’s a full conversation with him on the Your Ultimate Resource site, this is a summary of his message.

Listening to the Dalai Lama sharing His experiences and thoughts, one of the aspects which most impressed me was the amount of laughter – both from himself and from His audience.There is warm heartedness, humility and a lightness of spirit which is very apparent in His way of speaking, and His words are aimed directly at the hearts of His listeners. His message of compassion and loving kindness is based on common sense and practical living, and he is clear in asserting His belief that:

“The purpose of life is for happiness, to survive happily”

 

One of His central teachings about the development of compassion is based on the importance of childhood influences, particularly the effects of parenting. He reflects on His own childhood, and says he believes that mothers are the starting point of loving kindness. He describes His own mother’s simplicity, an uneducated village woman from a farming background, and immensely warm hearted. Contrasting her love and gentleness with the more disciplinarian approach of His father, he concludes that had he spent more time in His early years with His father he would probably not have been the same person.

“I believe that my altruistic mind and my compassion – the very seeds of that mind I got from my birth and the next few months and years with my mother – that was the real starting point to raise my model of loving kindness.”

He goes on to say to parents:

“What I say is this – give maximum affection to your children.
That is very essential to bring us a happier humanity.
The main hope for humanity relies on our future generations.
So families with children have a special role –
to give maximum affection to your children.
And parents – particularly mothers – spend more time with your children.”


Read More Here (Registration required)
© Christine Miller All Rights Reserved

For Fathers

In February 2012 I was invited by the shopping channel QVC UK to be their resident poet and take part in a ‘Love Letters’ project to encourage people to write romantic, appreciative  verses and letters to their loved ones, expressing gratitude for their presence and the joy they bring to life. It was a wonderful experience, producing over 100 poems in two days, and this one written for a much-adored father seems very fitting for Father’s Day today, June 17th 2012.

With Love and Appreciation to all fathers, everywhere.

For Fathers

Full of love,
Strong, courageous,
A father’s wisdom,
Treasured;
Your lifetime gift,
A priceless gem,
Enduring.

Source of wonder,
Giver of life,
Precious,
Embracing with warmth,
Laughing,
Strong.

I am grateful,
Eternally,
For your care,
Your gentleness,
Your being and heart,
For My Life
Expressed.

Christine Miller
February 2012

How to be Happy

A Mote of Dust Suspended in a Sunbeam…

 BIGGER PICTURE

I'm prompted, even provoked, today by the horror and human helplessness in the face of what's happening in Japan and the Pacific. In spite of being probably the best prepared country in the world for such events, there's little or nothing that can be done about the repercussions. 

It's easy to get wrapped up in the mundanities of life, fretting about details in the moment. Then something massive comes along and refocuses the attention in a much bigger arena and we realise what minute specks we are.

This photo of the earth as a pale blue dot, taken from Voyager in 1990 from around 6 billion kilometres away shows just what a tiny presence we really have in the universe.

 

FRAGILE HUMAN ENDEAVOURS

We are reminded also how fragile our human endeavours are in the face of natural forces. The empathetic feelings evoked by today's earthquake in Japan, with the Tsunamis relentlessly wiping out careful human constructions and carrying them off in epic tides that resemble a science fiction monster devouring huge objects in black treacly horror points up our physical impermanence.

Someone on TV said that he didn't think the Japan earthquake was connected to the recent New Zealand Christchurch earthquake. What? All that shifting, seething, abrading rock, lava and heat under the ocean, those faultlines along the Pacific Rim that make it the most volatile area for seismic activity on earth – not connected? 

To me, it's all connected, and it's all moving… all the time. 

I love Carl Sagan's account below. A moving experience and very timely. No further words needed from me. 

PALE BLUE DOT

 

Here's the transcript:

Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.

Carl Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Sagan